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Journey’s End Ranch April 2, 2016 Newsletter

Thanks to great reviews from our supporters, we received our 2016 Great NonProfits banner.Thank you!

March 10 was our 6th anniversary of becoming a 501C3.

April is our Spring Hay Drive and the first $2000 donated will be matched by a very generous friend & donor. $4000 will get us another 3 month’s worth of hay to feed our 26 sanctuary animals. We will also need a delivery of $1200 of hay pellets and supplements later this month. Your generosity enables us to provide a safe and happy home for 14 horses, 10 burros and 2 sheep.

hay delivery

hay delivery

The wild cottontails have decided to nest between the bottom bales of hay in the shed, instead of under the floor, so we will have to leave about 30 bales untouched for now, and feed it after nesting. I accidentally uncovered a nest of tiny babies, so I placed a pallet and piece of plywood leaning over them. Their Mama is fine with it and continues to care for them.

"Broken Ear', our favorite cottontail

“Broken Ear’, our favorite cottontail

Our weather has been beautiful and all the horses are shedding. On warmer days, a few of the mustangs want to be hosed off. We had one day of crazy 50mph winds, but escaped without anything important being damaged. This is Rusty, a 13 year old mustang.

DSCF7564

Diego is feeling and walking very well. He has also started to play with Red. As you know, Diego lived in isolation for 20 years. It has taken him 6 months to become bolder around other horses and to really enjoy their company. Red, a 22 year old mustang, arrived 1 and 1/2 years ago, latched onto Penny, and usually is not social with the other geldings. It is amazing how animals will help to heal one another.

Poco has been singing a lot. 

The hole in Rambeau‘s head has closed over. Whether or not he will grow a new horn, only time will tell.

Rambeau, now with one horn

Rambeau, now with one horn

We restarted our Facebook sharing contest. Anyone who shares any of our posts will have their name put in a hat each time they share, and 2 names are pulled every Saturday to receive Poco’s book. Thank you! You can also purchase books on our “Affiliates” page.

 Poco's book

Poco’s book

 

 

Please join us on Facebook, if you haven’t already. We post daily updates, pics and video.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/JERAS/  and

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Journeys-End-Ranch-Animal-Sanctuary/250656459004?fref=ts

Love,

Cathy & The Gang

Categories : News
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Journey’s End Ranch Animal Sanctuary March 2, 2016 Newsletter

February was very warm, the horses are already shedding their winter coats.

Some of our mustangs enjoying a run

Some of our mustangs enjoying a run

Len Johnson, wild horse documentarian, has released his latest video in a new format.We get a % donated to us by Len and we were even featured in the video. The film is about our wild neighbors, the Cerbat wild horses.They live, undisturbed, in a 400 square mile area and thrive there. The BLM does not round them up because we have mountain lions, so Mother Nature does the management. Len paid us a visit last summer.
http://lenjohnsonproductions.typepad.com

Len Johnson visits JERAS July 2015

Len Johnson visits JERAS July 2015

Poor Rambeau got his horn caught in the fence panel a week ago and broke it off, at the skull. This leaves a hole in the skull, very disturbing. There is nothing you can do excpet prevent infection and wait for closure. We initially stopped the bleeding with wound powder, then did a few flushes with vetericyn. He also got penicillin injections for a week. It is dry and the hole is considerably smaller. He was subdued for about 2 days, then bounced back to his usual self. Sheep are amazingly stoic and strong.

Rambeau, now with one horn

Rambeau, now with one horn

Well, that Diego continues to be a challenge. I sedated him and trimmed his feet Feb 13. A huge amount of “false” sole and dead tissue was finally ready to come out. I also found an old abscess and pocket of blood in his worst foot (the one with pedal osteitis, degeneration of the coffin bone). I then booted him with new Easyboot Trails. Wow, the next day, he was zooming around & feeling great. On the 15th, he lost the boot on his better front hoof. I decided to just remove the other, but it took a week to be able to do that. He had been running around like a wild man and had refused to be caught so the other boot could be removed. I moved a 10 foot pipe gate from the burro area over to the shelter I built in Diego’s area. I got Diego closed in there, but there was no way to halter him as he kicks violently when approached. I had an idea and hollowed out a carrot so I could insert a syringe full of dormosedan into it. Perfect fit. Went back to Diego, removed needle from syringe, offered him the carrot through the panel and squirted the drug into his mouth when he grabbed the carrot. Was not sure it would work at all, as dormosedan gel is meant to go UNDER tongue & I was shooting the injectable liquid form onto tongue. I waited the usual 45 minutes, he was sedated, but still spinning and trying to kick. I tried to undo the boot from outside using a long pole & hoof pick taped to it, no way. Too wild. I then had to squeeze him into a 5 X 10 area with a long metal pipe, he was still too wild to reach boot and remove with pole. I then gave him a dose of injectable dormosedan (double dose is considered safe) and waited 20 minutes. He got very quiet, but was still threatening to kick. I had hoped I could halter him & do a bit of trimming, but no way. I was finally able to use the pole with hoof pick through the panel and, despite him jumping around, undo the keeper strap and 2 velcro closures, but not without him kicking once and luckily striking the bar of the corral panel and not my head. Boot is off. There is no way to handle him safely in the future unless he has a huge attitude change or we get the vet out, close him in, and let the vet sedate him heavily.

I could help him a lot more if he were not so unruly and dangerous. He kicked me badly in the chest a few months ago for merely walking by him as he was eating. So, we do what we can. I cannot jeopardize the others by putting myself at too much risk of serious injury. He is now barefoot, walking fairly well, acting perky and eating well. He was getting very unhappy being closed into the small corral at night, and is now free to roam with the others all the time.

Poco has been singing a lot and had a Valentine’s Day song for his friends.

I did some hoof trimming this month, but a lot of the animals are virtually “self-trimming” now, thanks to lots of movement over abrasive ground.

I saw my first baby cottontail yesterday, venturing out from under the floor in the hay shed. With a safe place to hide, unlimited hay to eat and water available, it’s bunny heaven here.

Help us get a @GreatNonprofits 2016 Top-Rated Award, write a review of your experience with us!
http://greatnonprofits.org/org/journeys-end-ranch-animal-sanctuary
Thank you!!

Our donations were down a bit this month, several people saying it’s “tax time”. We always appreciate your support.
http://www.jersanctuary.org/donate-2/what-your-donations-accomplish/

What your donations accomplish
Journey’s End Ranch Animal Sanctuary is housed on Cathy’s 24 acres at no cost to the sanctuary. Therefore, all donations go directly to the animals’ care, with the exception of some office supplies. Cathy does not get paid for the work she does, caring for the animals alone with very little outside help, despite serious health problems. Cathy does much of the vetting and the hoof trimming, too.
$20.00 will buy a new hoof rasp for the hoof trimming that Cathy does herself.
$30.00 will feed the numerous wild quail, doves, rabbits and ravens we feed for a month.
$40.00 will feed Rambeau & Stripey, the Barbados sheep, for a month.
$15 will buy a 50# sack of the hay pellets that Knickers and Warrior require, as they are old & missing teeth.
$15.00 also buys a 100# bale of hay. We use 2.5-3 bales a day to feed 10 burros and 14 horses.
$30.00 buys a bucket of the vitamin mineral supplement the equines get and will last 3 weeks.
$40.00 will supply a burro with hay for a month.
$80.00 buys enough hay to feed a horse for a month.
$148.00 will cover a ranch call when we need the vet to come (not very often, as good management is the best medicine).
$208.00 will cover the cost of a dental for one equine.

Thank you!
Love,
Cathy & The Gang

Categories : News
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February 1, 2016 Journey’s End Ranch Animal Sanctuary Newsletter

We had a fairly mild January, with a little rain. February arrived today bringing snow flurries. Poco is not thrilled with the little bit of snow & is spending a lot of time in his shed with Chico.

Poco & Chico

Poco & Chico

Poco & Chico got blankets, but Chico was very spooky about trying his on and Poco seemed a bit embarrassed about his. The weather has not been cold enough to warrant wearing them,  but we have them just in case.

jan 15 poco blanket

 

We waited for drier weather to get the bulk of our hay delivered and are in good shape through April, thanks to our generous supporters.

Hay in the shed and under a tarp, too

Hay in the shed and under a tarp, too

I got a pair of rabbits (as personal pets). They are sweet sisters, 4 months old. Their names are Ebony & Ivory. I can’t trust my immune system/allergies to have them indoors, but they have a 10 X 20 foot pen, with lots of shelter, dig proof & shade cloth over the top. Today, the wild bunnies all looked puffed up and cold, but Ebony & Ivory were out frolicking in the snow flurries.

Ebony & Ivory

Ebony & Ivory

We ordered a new Easyboot style for Diego who was wearing out the Clouds. He will never be sound with the degenerative condition in his foot, but he is very enthusiastic about life. He loves eating, wandering about & playing with the other horses.

Diego

All of the other horses and burros are fine. We now have 5 horses between the ages of 21 and 34, and firmly believe in the advantages of “natural horse keeping.” Proper diet without processed, unnatural ingredients, room to move about 24/7, and companionship help to keep them happy and as healthy as possible. http://www.jersanctuary.org/natural-and-organic-care/horse-health/

Seven of the mustangs

Seven of the mustangs

 

We received $108. from Smith’s Community rewards for the last quarter. If you shop at Smiths, Fred Myer or Krogers, you can help us by merely signing up and each time you shop, we get rewarded. http://www.jersanctuary.org/2014/01/shop-smiths-can-help-us/

Finally, our county is on the warpath against our wild burros, blaming them for habitat damage and causing accidents on the road which actually runs through designated burro habitat as per 1971 Wild Free Roaming Hoses and Burros Act. They actually suggested that hunting may be an option to control numbers! We have thousands of privately owned cattle running loose on our public lands here, and research shows them to be much more detrimental to the environment than equines who actually evolved here for millions of years. Our friend, Terry, who was the one who found Poco in 2014, made this great educational video re: wild burros.

Many thanks to our friends and supporters!

Love,

Cathy & The Gang

Categories : News
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