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Journey’s End Ranch Newsletter April 16, 2018

We were featured in a very nice article in our local newspaper yesterday. Much thanks to Travis Rains, reporter.

https://kdminer.com/news/2018/apr/15/local-nonprofits-give-animals-second-chances/

Thank you to everyone who donated to my Facebook Birthday fundraiser!

It’s time for new reviews so we can get our 2018 banner. Thank you! https://greatnonprofits.org/reviews/write/journeys-end-ranch-animal-sanctuary

Our biggest gopher snake is out & about.

thirsty gopher snake

The horses are shedding, Poco is singing and the local ravens must be feeding young, as they come begging for handouts.

raven

Our favorite wild cottontail has become a stalker.

 

We are devoting the rest of this newsletter to the issue of over-vaccinating animals and the risks and damage that can occur.

Love, Cathy & the Gang

Buddy

 

We took in an older dog on March 19.  We have had no dogs since 2014 because I had developed severe allergies (anaphylactic) to dogs. Since then, I have researched a lot and discovered some things I could do to address my out of control immune system. Living without a dog has been almost unbearable. I decided to look for a dog who was not very adoptable or at risk and one who could live outdoors. I found “Buddy”online at the local shelter. He is about 8 years old and was described as a dog who “needed his space”, did not like strangers and would do   best living “in the middle of nowhere”. Well, that sounded right for me. He had been adopted & returned to the local shelter twice between Nov. and March. My friend and our VP, Bonnie, picked him up on my 64th birthday. He arrived and was very skittish. When I saw his paperwork, I discovered that, between the shelter and one local vet, he was given ELEVEN vaccinations over a 4 month period. He’s terribly fearful & I think they damaged his brain. We also had Hemopet (Dr.Jean Dodds) run a thyroid panel and he came in just under mid range “normal”. However, we have had several “subclinical” dogs who had behavioral issues and responded well to low dose thyroxine which bumped them up into the higher normal values. In addition, he was listed as a shepherd mix, but I and 3 other dog knowledgeable people see some Akita in him. He has a few Akita characteristics, such as hiding his poop. Akitas have a very high incidence of thyroid disease and they do best when their thyroid values are in high normal. So, we tried a  low dose of thyroxine and his behavior improved overnight. He is also getting supplements to help him detox,  for liver support and to help with vaccine reactions. He has to live outdoors because of my allergies, but he feels safe here. He sleeps outside my bedroom window & loves  visiting through the glass.  He still tends to run from me in his yard, but if I encourage him to jump up onto his bed, he sits like a statue to be petted.  I call him Buddy. I wear my respirator around him to be safe.
As has happened so often in the past, I ended up researching to help an animal and found something to help me. I googled “healing glial cells” (brain) and found an NIH study on rats infected with Lyme disease and how acetate helped protect their brains. Eureka!  I did more research and found a substance called DCA (dichloroacetate) which is used to treat mitochondrial dysfunction and also shows promise for killing cancer cells. I researched more to discover that chronic infections such as Lyme can cause mitochondrial dysfunction, meaning every cell in your body is not working properly. Mitochondria are involved in cellular energy production and also modulate the immune system. I obtained some DCA and am seeing changes in just a few weeks. One obvious thing is that the toenail I lost many months ago, which had not grown back at all, is now almost all grown in. My pain levels are reduced. I only found the info on DCA because I was googling how I might help Buddy. What a blessing! Buddy seems to be getting more comfortable as time goes by. I did find a small oral “tumor” in the front of his mouth. It could be benign or as bad as oral melanoma, which is quite serious in dogs. Our vet was supposed to be here for a ranch call last week and to look at Buddy’s mouth, but they had to delay the visit until late April. We emailed a picture to them and they think it looks benign, but will see him in a few weeks. Thank goodness! He’s too spooky to put him through the stress of riding in a crate to go all the way into town in the back of the truck. 
The following is his vaccination history. Sorry for ranting, but this is a pet peeve. Veterinary care should improve the lives of animals, not cause them to become ill. We have sent our concerns to both the shelter and local vet.

Buddy, formerly “Ace”

Approx. 8 year old mix, listed as shepherd, but appears to be part Akita.

Adopted  3/19/18 (2 failed adoptions before this)

10/24/17             shelter           Combo & intranasal

11/1/17.               shelter            Rabies

12/1/17.             shelter              Combo & intranasal

(these were all the vaccinations he needed, period)

Adopted out        

12/19/17              Local vet    Combo & intranasal

1/12/18                Local vet   Combo & intranasal   

Returned to shelter

2/26/18                 shelter            Combo & intranasal again!

ELEVEN vaccinations to a senior dog in four months! Blatant malpractice.

Also, either the vet missed his ORAL TUMOR (up front & easy to see)  or it  was not mentioned in  paperwork. 

 Everyone knows the shelter gives vaccinations. The veterinary clinic is AAHA (American Animal Hospital Assn.) certified. AAHA recommends core disease boosters EVERY THREE YEARS.

He is now very fearful. According to the shelter, he had become worse over time. His first adopter had actually taken him in for grooming, so we assume he was much less fearful then, too. We found this online

“According to Dr Jean W Dodds, an eminent vet and researcher, both allergic and autoimmune diseases have been rising since the introduction of modified live virus vaccines.  Autoimmune diseases are where the body attacks self; they include cancer, leukemia, thyroid disease, Addisons, Grave’s disease, autoimmune hemolytic anaemia, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, lupus, thrombocytopenia, organ failure, skin inflammations, and more.

We also seem to have a tremendous number of dogs with behavioural problems, largely due to over-vaccination and processed pet food.  Vaccines are known to cause inflammation of the brain, as well as lesions throughout the brain and central nervous system.  The medical term for this is ‘encephalitis’, and vaccine’s role is acknowledged in the Merck Manual.  Merck is a vaccine manufacturer.”

         

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Journey’s End Ranch Animal Sanctuary Oct. 3, 2014 Newsletter

September brought us an incredible amount of rain. We got 7 inches in a 10 day period, and our annual rainfall is usually only 8 inches. Some areas of Arizona had terrible flooding, but JERAS is on sloping ground and the water ran off quite nicely. It did cause even more grass to grow. The burro herd has been able to go out to graze every day and they love it. They have pretty much mowed the 12 extra acres.

Burros enjoying some grazing

Burros enjoying some grazing

 

There are 190 BLM  “Sale Authority” burros in BLM holding facilities. These are older animals which are considered “unadoptable” because of age or being passed over at adoption events. BLM was actually planning to send 100 to Guatemala, to be used as beasts of burden. This is not a fate that our American, formerly wild burros deserve! Our friend, Elaine Nash has organized an effort to get people to purchase as many of these burros as possible and get them into caring homes. The Platero Project (HSUS) is also involved. Elaine also created the organization, “Fleet of Angels”, a national group of volunteers who assist in transporting rescued and at risk equines to their new homes. You can apply for these burros and the cost is only $25 each. BLM will be delivering semi-loads of burros to several locations across the USA. Fleet of Angels will assist with transporting from there. We have applied to take 2. If interested, you can join the Facebook group https://www.facebook.com/groups/Keep.Americas.Wild.Equines.In.America/permalink/534295490048755/

We have a new mustang! Our friend, Annie, told us about a mustang and burro who needed new homes. Their owner had passed away and his widow is not well enough to continue caring for them. We called our friends and neighbors, Bill and Audrey, to see if they wanted the jenny, as their burro had died of a rattlesnake bite last month. They said yes. We decided we could take on the mustang, “Red”. He is 20 years old and had been found abandoned 4 years ago and was taken in by Leslie and her husband. Bill and Audrey borrowed a trailer and travelled 40 miles to get them yesterday. Red seems happy to be here, as he had not had the company of other horses for 4 years. He is being kept separate for a few days, as we are gradually switching him from alfalfa to grass hay. He has spent most of his time in a small corral, and we were told he paces and cribs. He should  be happy here on 3 acres with other horses. Warrior and Lucky seem to like him and Penny seems to have a crush on him already.

Red

Red

DSCF0948

Penny meeting Red

 

Our local shelter, Western Arizona Humane Society,  has a new manager and she is really shaking things up. In the past, they did not even have a volunteer program. The “live release” rate is only 61% for dogs and 46% for cats. Mary, the new manager, has started a volunteer program, has replaced a lot of staff and things are really looking up for our county’s animals. The Kingman Low Cost Spay And Neuter Clinic is also doing great work, with a new TNR (trap, neuter, release) program for cats, low cost vaccination clinics and low cost spay and neuter. One of our board members, Billie, volunteers her time at the clinic and also transports a lot of animals to help with adoptions at the shelter. I  just met a new friend on Facebook, Kerry, who is a great photographer. She has helped a lot of local rescues with their websites and videos. She is now going to the shelter to photograph animals and I am helping her by sharing the animals to our >6000 Facebook fans, to my many Fb connections and via email. It is really helping to save lives.  I have offered to spend at least an hour a day helping network these at risk dogs and cats. Here are a samples of Kerry’s work. Aurora was adopted and Charlie, the Treeing Walker Coonhound, still needs a home.

Thank you, Kerry, for helping this dog find a great home!

Thank you, Kerry, for helping this dog find a great home!

Image 1

This gorgouss coonhound needs a home! Call WAHS (928) 753-2727 and tell them you want “Charlie”

 

We want to thank our supporters for enabling us to give a safe and caring home to 20 equines and Rambeau, the sheep. We can’t do it without your help!

Love,

Cathy & the Gang.

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Tomorrow is our 4th anniversary of becoming a 501(c)3  How time has passed so quickly!

We have had a very mild winter and sure feel sorry for most of the rest of the country which had such a rough one. The horses are already shedding and a few of the mustangs ask to be hosed down when I am filling the water troughs.

Rhonda, our 11 year old beagle who arrived 2 years ago, appears to have degenerative myelopathy. I noticed her rear end was weak when we got her out of the local shelter 2 years ago. With lots of room to run, she got stronger. Several months ago, she started getting a bit wobbly and ataxic in her hind end. She has no pain. I always try to avoid running to the vet for every issue that comes up, as we cannot afford to and I am an enthusiastic problem-solver. I did a little internet research and found that degenerative myelopathy is the only hind end disorder with no pain involved. Usually, a dog is paralyzed within 6 months to a year of developing any symptoms. However, I am a huge fan of supplements and I feel some that I have been giving her for 2 years have slowed the progression. This article was very informative. http://www.examiner.com/article/dr-r-m-clemmons-and-the-fight-against-degenerative-myelopathy-of-german-shepherd-dogs the drug used to delay the progression of this condition is expensive, but I just found a compounding pharmacy that is said to be much cheaper and will have our vet call them tomorrow (update, we can get it for $17 a month and it is on its way). At any rate, we will continue with supplements and give her the best quality of life possible until her hind end gives out. Rhonda is very high strung and has some anxiety issues, so a cart/wheelchair would not be a solution in my opinion. She also needs to be able to get through the dog doors and our terrain is not level or smooth. Rhonda is the most joyful and funny little girl, her tail is always wagging, and she is often baying her head off. She was found on the streets and was never claimed from the local shelter. She had never been spayed and she protects her collection of stuffed animals and carries them around, so it seems she had been used as a breeder until no longer “useful”. The extensive dental she required 2 years ago left her with a lot of missing teeth and her smile always reminds me of a Jack-o-lantern. Taking in old and ill animals is always inviting heartbreak, but the joy they experience by being given a new life makes it worthwhile.

Rhonda

Rhonda

Carson is starting to feel his age, but is still active and a source of constant amusement for me. He is the smartest, most obstinate, bossy dog I have ever met. I love him so much!

Rainy & Carson March 7

Rainy & Carson March 7

Jabari, the basenji we took in from the horrific OAS hoarding situation, has gone to a wonderful new home after being with us for medical care and rehab for 5 weeks. He was somewhat intimidated by our other boisterous dogs and our friend, Keith (a BRAT volunteer) found him a home with a man who was raised with basenjis and with two daughters who have bonded with Jabari. They were willing to deal with Jabari’s Fanconi syndrome and need for testing, supplements and thyroid medicine for the rest of his life. Jabari is about 6 years old and went through living hell at OAS, where dogs were kept crated for months to years, in a metal building. They were fed unrefrigerated raw meat, and were only fed every other day. No one knows his history, but his new family has found him to be very smart, playful and entertaining. It is a miracle he survived and it is no wonder he was aggressive when he first arrived in Arizona. With medical care, good nutrition, love and patience, he has blossomed. We are so grateful to Keith, Bernard, Kenzie and Kiana!

Jabari in his new home

Jabari in his new home

Our Vice President, Bonnie, who lives 40 miles north of JERAS, had been feeding an an abandoned dog for a few weeks. He was in a yard down the road from her. When no one claimed him, she took pictures, we networked him and within days, he had been transported to Las Vegas where a rescue group took care of his veterinary needs, neutered him, had him groomed and placed him in a loving home. Thank you, Bonnie,  Beth Snook of Niki’s Pals(who transported him) and So NV Australian Shepherd Rescue! It really does “take a village”.

Teddy, sad and alone

Teddy, sad and alone

Teddy after grooming & in a home

Teddy after grooming & in a home

Bear and Maggie got early haircuts and both are very happy. Bear is actually doing pirouettes and I keep thinking we have acquired a black poodle. Apparently, Bear is not crazy about his Chow Chow coat and getting rid of it has been a blessing for him. He was a once-feral dog and has been with us for 9 years.

Maggie, now 13. She was tired after her grooming session.

Maggie, now 13. She was tired after her grooming session.

Bear

Bear

Our local shelter/animal control has a new manager. Mary used to work for our vet and had been a shelter manager in Ca. for 8 years at one time. Things are really improving there now and they actually have a Facebook page up, too. We are thrilled to know that many more local animals will be saved now. https://www.facebook.com/pages/Western-Arizona-Humane-Society-Kingman/667763806617095  We have fostered 6 dogs from that shelter in the past few years and try to network the dogs and cats there as much as time allows me to.

.
Sienna, the quarter horse mare we took in last spring,  is never going to be sound and is going to live permanently at a rescue who adopted her out 2 years ago. When the adopter decided they no longer wanted her, they violated their contract and sold her, instead of returning her to C Bar J Rescue. She went through another two homes and was then “free” on Craig’s list. I thought we might be able to rehab her with body work and hoof trimming, but she has arthritis in an elbow and will not be rideable. We are happy that C Bar J wants her back as a permanent resident and it will lessen my work load and help our finances.

Sienna

Sienna

Sienna

Sienna

Our bank account was very low and had me extremely worried, as these animals have to be fed. We have a wonderful new supporter whose generosity has come to our immediate rescue, but we still need to broaden our donor base to afford some future security for these horses, burros, dogs, pigs and sheep. Please help if you can or at least share our website, Facebook page and Affiliates page. I can care for the animals, but funding is needed to buy the feed and supplies they require. I am turning SIXTY this month, so please make it a happy birthday by helping us. Thank you!

Here’s a gift idea! You can make a donation to us in behalf of someone else, such as your grandkids, and we will send one of our photo cards to them, with the story of the animal featured. Just make a donation of $10 or more and be sure to include a note and the name and address of the recipient when using Paypal or sending a check. Thank you!

Do you shop at Smith’s, Kroger or Fred Myer? You can help us!
 All you need is a Smith’s Rewards Card and then go online to create an account and choose Journeys End Ranch Animal Sanctuary. Every time you shop and swipe your card, you will be helping the animals here. Click here for instructions. http://www.jersanctuary.org/2014/01/shop-smiths-can-help-us/

Affiliates- http://www.jersanctuary.org/available-merchandise/

Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Journeys-End-Ranch-Animal-Sanctuary/250656459004?fref=ts

 

Cathy & Carson

 

 

 

 

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We are a Non-Profit 501(c)3 organization.