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Journey’s End Ranch Newsletter Sept. 21, 2019

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Summer is over! We are glad to have cooler weather after a long, hot summer.

We released the orphaned quail after 8 weeks and they were happy to fly off. We still have dozens coming daily to eat and drink.

Cuckoo Bird (roadrunner) has shown up a few times, once with his mate. He was following me around begging, so, of course, he got a bit to eat.

Jovita is about to turn 15. It seems like yesterday that she was born. Her mother, Serena, was captured by the BLM about 40 miles south of us and delivered Jo 6 months later. They are inseparable. Jo was bitten by a rattler at about 2 years of age and it took several visits from our vet to save her.

Serena & Jovita

We trimmed Poco’s feet and sawed off some of his deformed hoof. Now that it is cooler, we have seen him playing with Chico a few times.

Red, a 25 year old mustang, arrived 5 years ago and continues to thrive after years of confinement in a pen. http://www.jersanctuary.org/horses-and-burros/red/

It was thrilling to see him the first time he was turned out with the others on 3 acres.

Forty seven years ago, I was fortunate to be accepted into SUNY Delhi’s Veterinary Technology program. It was the first college in the country to offer these courses and we had several veterinarians as professors. Dr. Walter Collins was my student advisor, a great teacher and wonderful person. He passed away earlier this year and I found this glowing article about him.

https://www.avma.org/News/JAVMANews/Pages/190401s.aspx

We have another delivery of hay pellets coming in a week, which runs ~$3500 for a 3 month supply to feed 12 horse and 4 burros. Donations are always needed & greatly appreciated.

We also appreciate Facebook friends who choose us for their birthday fundraisers. Nancy Finn, a loyal supporter, just raised $500 from her birthday. She also sells great stuff on Etsy and we receive a % of her sales. “Its all about One Of a Kind and vintage finds!”https://www.etsy.com/shop/peppermintannie

Love,

Cathy & the Gang

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Share this!  Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailJourney’s End Ranch Animal Sanctuary February 18, 2019 Newsletter

Hi! This will be short because I fell & hit my head, tweaked my neck 2 days ago & now it is snowing here.

Feb. 18 snow

We lost Warrior last month. One day, he just could not walk anymore, despite medication & supplements. He truly lived up to his name & is sorely missed.

Warrior

In Memory of Warrior

Our nutty roadrunner comes daily for a meal and brought a friend yesterday.

 

We had some grading done right before we got an inch & a half of rain the other day. We filled in the big hole Bayron had dug while playing, buried some old moldy hay debris and made a trench to run water away from the hay shed.

We are going to be feeding pure hay pellets instead of hay, as the local hay tends to be very dusty and is not good for the animals’ lungs or mine. We had a lab analysis and both the Bermuda and alfalfa pellets tested very well, with low NSC/ESC (simple sugars). This is important to avoid issues with insulin resistance and laminitis.We just got 9 tons delivered. The price is slightly higher than bales, but there will be zero waste & it is easier for the tooth challenged old horses to eat & digest. This load cost $3500 and will hopefully last about 2 & 1/2 months. Your donations are appreciated!

1500# bags of hay pellets

Poco prefers pellets to hay and sings for his.

The old horses feel frisky despite their ages. Here are Penny (29), Dakota (28) and Red (25) taking a little canter.

Rambeau is always amusing.

Buddy just loves his daily scooter trips

Well, still snowing, work to do.
Thank you for your support!

Love,
Cathy & the Gang

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Share this!  Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailJourney’s End Ranch Newsletter April 16, 2018

We were featured in a very nice article in our local newspaper yesterday. Much thanks to Travis Rains, reporter.

https://kdminer.com/news/2018/apr/15/local-nonprofits-give-animals-second-chances/

Thank you to everyone who donated to my Facebook Birthday fundraiser!

It’s time for new reviews so we can get our 2018 banner. Thank you! https://greatnonprofits.org/reviews/write/journeys-end-ranch-animal-sanctuary

Our biggest gopher snake is out & about.

thirsty gopher snake

The horses are shedding, Poco is singing and the local ravens must be feeding young, as they come begging for handouts.

raven

Our favorite wild cottontail has become a stalker.

 

We are devoting the rest of this newsletter to the issue of over-vaccinating animals and the risks and damage that can occur.

Love, Cathy & the Gang

Buddy

 

We took in an older dog on March 19.  We have had no dogs since 2014 because I had developed severe allergies (anaphylactic) to dogs. Since then, I have researched a lot and discovered some things I could do to address my out of control immune system. Living without a dog has been almost unbearable. I decided to look for a dog who was not very adoptable or at risk and one who could live outdoors. I found “Buddy”online at the local shelter. He is about 8 years old and was described as a dog who “needed his space”, did not like strangers and would do   best living “in the middle of nowhere”. Well, that sounded right for me. He had been adopted & returned to the local shelter twice between Nov. and March. My friend and our VP, Bonnie, picked him up on my 64th birthday. He arrived and was very skittish. When I saw his paperwork, I discovered that, between the shelter and one local vet, he was given ELEVEN vaccinations over a 4 month period. He’s terribly fearful & I think they damaged his brain. We also had Hemopet (Dr.Jean Dodds) run a thyroid panel and he came in just under mid range “normal”. However, we have had several “subclinical” dogs who had behavioral issues and responded well to low dose thyroxine which bumped them up into the higher normal values. In addition, he was listed as a shepherd mix, but I and 3 other dog knowledgeable people see some Akita in him. He has a few Akita characteristics, such as hiding his poop. Akitas have a very high incidence of thyroid disease and they do best when their thyroid values are in high normal. So, we tried a  low dose of thyroxine and his behavior improved overnight. He is also getting supplements to help him detox,  for liver support and to help with vaccine reactions. He has to live outdoors because of my allergies, but he feels safe here. He sleeps outside my bedroom window & loves  visiting through the glass.  He still tends to run from me in his yard, but if I encourage him to jump up onto his bed, he sits like a statue to be petted.  I call him Buddy. I wear my respirator around him to be safe.
As has happened so often in the past, I ended up researching to help an animal and found something to help me. I googled “healing glial cells” (brain) and found an NIH study on rats infected with Lyme disease and how acetate helped protect their brains. Eureka!  I did more research and found a substance called DCA (dichloroacetate) which is used to treat mitochondrial dysfunction and also shows promise for killing cancer cells. I researched more to discover that chronic infections such as Lyme can cause mitochondrial dysfunction, meaning every cell in your body is not working properly. Mitochondria are involved in cellular energy production and also modulate the immune system. I obtained some DCA and am seeing changes in just a few weeks. One obvious thing is that the toenail I lost many months ago, which had not grown back at all, is now almost all grown in. My pain levels are reduced. I only found the info on DCA because I was googling how I might help Buddy. What a blessing! Buddy seems to be getting more comfortable as time goes by. I did find a small oral “tumor” in the front of his mouth. It could be benign or as bad as oral melanoma, which is quite serious in dogs. Our vet was supposed to be here for a ranch call last week and to look at Buddy’s mouth, but they had to delay the visit until late April. We emailed a picture to them and they think it looks benign, but will see him in a few weeks. Thank goodness! He’s too spooky to put him through the stress of riding in a crate to go all the way into town in the back of the truck. 
The following is his vaccination history. Sorry for ranting, but this is a pet peeve. Veterinary care should improve the lives of animals, not cause them to become ill. We have sent our concerns to both the shelter and local vet.

Buddy, formerly “Ace”

Approx. 8 year old mix, listed as shepherd, but appears to be part Akita.

Adopted  3/19/18 (2 failed adoptions before this)

10/24/17             shelter           Combo & intranasal

11/1/17.               shelter            Rabies

12/1/17.             shelter              Combo & intranasal

(these were all the vaccinations he needed, period)

Adopted out        

12/19/17              Local vet    Combo & intranasal

1/12/18                Local vet   Combo & intranasal   

Returned to shelter

2/26/18                 shelter            Combo & intranasal again!

ELEVEN vaccinations to a senior dog in four months! Blatant malpractice.

Also, either the vet missed his ORAL TUMOR (up front & easy to see)  or it  was not mentioned in  paperwork. 

 Everyone knows the shelter gives vaccinations. The veterinary clinic is AAHA (American Animal Hospital Assn.) certified. AAHA recommends core disease boosters EVERY THREE YEARS.

He is now very fearful. According to the shelter, he had become worse over time. His first adopter had actually taken him in for grooming, so we assume he was much less fearful then, too. We found this online

“According to Dr Jean W Dodds, an eminent vet and researcher, both allergic and autoimmune diseases have been rising since the introduction of modified live virus vaccines.  Autoimmune diseases are where the body attacks self; they include cancer, leukemia, thyroid disease, Addisons, Grave’s disease, autoimmune hemolytic anaemia, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, lupus, thrombocytopenia, organ failure, skin inflammations, and more.

We also seem to have a tremendous number of dogs with behavioural problems, largely due to over-vaccination and processed pet food.  Vaccines are known to cause inflammation of the brain, as well as lesions throughout the brain and central nervous system.  The medical term for this is ‘encephalitis’, and vaccine’s role is acknowledged in the Merck Manual.  Merck is a vaccine manufacturer.”

         

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