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Journey’s End Ranch Animal Sanctuary March 1, 2015 News

Journey’s End Ranch has provided a home for animals in need since 2002, but this month, we celebrate 5 years as a 501c3 nonprofit organization. We are very grateful to our supporters who have enabled us to do so much for so many animals. In addition to donations, a small army of people helped us win 2 grants in contests in 2012 which enabled us to install  additional shelters, a large hay shed and to fence in more acreage. Last year, ASPCA gave us a grant for a shelter for our burro herd. We are now home to 13 horses (11 are mustangs), 10 burros and a sheep. They all seem to thrive in this environment where we practice “natural” horse care by providing the correct diet, natural barefoot hoof care and lots of space. Five of our burros are 16 years or older and 6 of our horses are 16 or older, the oldest being Knickers, who turns 33 soon. Many of these animals have permanent injuries, but they still manage to enjoy life which is evident in the amount of playing that occurs here.

Even Poco, the burro with the deformed hoof, is learning how to play.

Bayron has recovered from his gelding surgery and will join the older horses soon. He will be better off with them, a his progressive ligament disease would make living in our main mustang herd too challenging for him.

Bayron

Bayron

We have had some magnificent skies!

sunrise

sunrise

The desert can be a harsh environment, even for wildlife. We try to help the wild ones by providing numerous water pans, some bird seed and even a bit of dog food for our local pair of ravens. We see cottontails, jackrabbits, doves, quail, songbirds, ravens and an occasional coyote. A hawk swooped in recently and made a meal of one of the doves, but that is Nature’s way. There are even a pair of kangaroo rats showing up just after dark lately. They are quite brave and will come right up to me.

Kangaroo rats

Kangaroo rats

We are proud to have been given “Top Rated NonProfits” status by Great NonProfits for the past 3 years.  It is based on personal reviews. We need 10 new reviews this year. You can leave a review yearly. If you’d like to, go to this link. Thank you!

http://greatnonprofits.org/org/journeys-end-ranch-animal-sanctuary

We got another order of Poco books. If you want to order, please go here for info- http://www.jersanctuary.org/available-merchandise/

Thank you for your support, which is greatly needed and appreciated.

Love,

Cathy & the Gang

 

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New Facebook Policy Bad News for Non-profits
Facebook has a new policy and is only posting “business” page posts to ~2% of the fans of the page. It is devastating for non-profits, as almost no one sees our posts. We have > 6,000 fans on our fan page and only usually fewer than 100 will see our posts. We can no longer reach many people.

We depend on our engagement with our Facebook friends & fans to keep people updated and to keep support coming in.

We have 23 horses & burros who depend on your help. We greatly appreciate those who are able to donate, but anyone can make a big difference by visiting our pages and sharing posts. When you share our pages, share our posts or invite friends to join us, you will reach many more people and will help us a great deal. Thank you!

Please join us on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/groups/JERAS/

and

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Journeys-End-Ranch-Animal-Sanctuary/250656459004?fref=ts 

Penny & Red enjoying a run

Penny & Red enjoying a run

Burros enjoying some grazing

Burros enjoying some grazing

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Journey’s End Ranch Animal Sanctuary Feb.1, 2015 Newsletter

We had snow on the ground for 4 days after getting 7 inches of snow on New Year’s. Pulling the hay cart through it was difficult, but at least it did not last long. Our weather then returned to our usual mild conditions. We did just get an inch of rain, always welcomed in the desert. Hopefully, a lot of grass and edible plants will come up soon and the burros can go back to some grazing on our extra 12 acres.

We are also thankful to our friends, Bill & Calvin, who came over and added supports to the shelters and hay shed in December. Even with the wind and snow load, everything here stayed secure.

I managed to do hoof trims on the 14 horses and burros who needed some minor trimming. Farriers here charge $50 for a trim and we save money and get the “natural barefoot” hoof trim that most farriers don’t know how to do. I am always grateful for the natural trim experts who have written books and articles and for the advice I get from professional trimmers on Facebook. Warrior and Lucky are moving well, despite having joint problems from past misuse. Little Chico, Poco’s friend, was good about his trim, though he did try to kick me 3 times before letting me handle his back feet. He sure is spunky for his diminutive size and advanced age.

Poco is happy to announce that 92 of his books have gone to new homes. We appreciate photos from his young friends, too.

Thank you, Raelyn!

Thank you, Raelyn!

You can order your own copy at our “merchandise” page.

Image

Thank you, Bella!

Our veterinarian was out January 20 to geld Bayron. Despite weeks of trying to desensitize him and help him with his fear, Bayron continues to be terrified of people touching him. His former caretaker said he was always fearful, but that he returned with severe issues after being sent to a “trainer” for a month several years ago. We can only imagine the abuse he must have suffered. We had to squeeze him into the end of the corral and our vet was extremely patient and gentle. Bayron required a tranquilizer, sedative and anesthesia, given in steps, to finally put him down on the ground so he could be gelded. Even so, soon after the surgery, he was struggling to get up on his feet, instead of staying down awhile like most horses do. Our vet has worked with horses for more than 50 years and was not expecting such a fearful horse. In a month or so, when it is OK to let him join others, our friends have offered to bring their stock trailer over. We can run him into it and move him that way. Of our 23 equines, we only have one other who is virtually “untouchable”. Cheyenne arrived in summer 2012 and is now 18. She has a visible dent in her windpipe and we suspect she was once “choked down” with a lariat. Sometimes, animals have suffered such severe mental trauma that they just will not recover. In the case of equines, they need to be given a  natural environment and the company of others so they can at least find some happiness and peace.

Bayron

Bayron

Between Bayron’s surgery, the delivery of 256 bales of hay and more than a ton of pellets and other feed, we spent $5400 this month. Donations are always needed and greatly appreciated!

13 tons of hay

13 tons of hay

We are always proud to say that our animals are happy. Giving them proper care, feeding and space creates animals who learn to enjoy life, even after abuse, neglect and injuries.

 

 

Thank you for your support!
Love,
Cathy & the Gang

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We are a Non-Profit 501 (c)3 organization.